Coronavirus UPDATE: Recap 7/4/20

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Coronavirus UPDATE: Recap 7-3-20

(WellnessPursuits.com) – Wednesday, July 1 and Thursday, July 2, saw record numbers of reported COVID-19 infections in the US with 51,097 and a whopping 57,236 cases reported each day, respectively. Those two days were the culmination of a week of record-setting numbers, all greater than the previous high of 39,123 cases in a day set in April. The average over the last 8 days has been 46,367 cases per day, quickly pushing the US past the 2.5 million mark this week.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, characterized the recent surge as “the beginning.” She emphasized that infection is spreading far too quickly in too many diverse places throughout the country for vectors to be traced, isolated and contained.

We have more details on these and other highlights from the week:

COVID-19: Snapshot of the Week

Last week, as of 1:00 PM EDT (17:00 GMT), June 24, 2020, the reported worldwide numbers were 9,436,058 cases and 481,970 deaths in 213 countries and territories. There were 5,097,085 recoveries reported worldwide.

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The US had 2,440,841 reported cases and 123,830 deaths. New York accounted for 413,150 of those cases and 31,340 of those deaths. California, New Jersey, Illinois, Texas, Florida and Massachusetts were the states with the next highest numbers of reported cases (all above 107,000).

The US Military reported 14,073 cases and 36 deaths while the Veterans Affairs reported 19,568 cases and 1,550 deaths. The Navajo Nation reported 7,088 cases and 336 deaths. Federal Prisons reported 7,103 cases and 88 deaths.

This week, as of 9:00 AM EDT (13:00 GMT), July 3, 2020, the reported worldwide numbers were 11,033,096 cases and 525,141 deaths in 213 countries and territories. There were 6,185,435 recoveries reported worldwide.

The US had 2,838,922 reported cases and 131,544 deaths. New York accounted for 419,640 of those cases and 32,166 of those deaths. California (247,743 reported cases), Texas (183,044 reported cases), New Jersey (177,654 reported cases), Florida (169,106 reported cases) and Illinois (145,935 reported cases) were the states with the next highest numbers of reported cases (all above 146,000).

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States following in the next tier down are Massachusetts (109,338 reported cases), Pennsylvania (92,703 reported cases), Georgia (87,709) and Arizona (87,425 reported cases).

The US Military reported 18,071 cases and 38 deaths while the Veterans Affairs reported 23,945 cases and 1,667 deaths. The Navajo Nation reported 7,613 cases and 369 deaths. Federal Prisons reported 7,618 cases and 92 deaths.

National and State Reopenings

Last week, we reported that all 52 states, districts and territories had reopened to varying degrees. This week, due to rising levels of infection, 4 states are reversing course and 12 states are pausing their plans for reopening.

  • Alabama — Pausing. Open amenities include parks, beaches, gyms, retail stores, restaurant dining, bars, breweries, salons and entertainment venues, including theaters. Capacity limits will remain in place until at least the end of July based on rising infection numbers.
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  • Alaska Reopened. All businesses allowed to operate at full capacity.
  • Arizona Reversing. Amenities now closed include bars, movie theaters, gyms, tubing rentals and water parks. Open amenities include retail stores, barbershops, salons, restaurant dining, pools (capacity capped at 10), spas and casinos. Public gatherings are capped at 50. These new closures and limits will remain in place until July 27th.
  • Arkansas Pausing. Open amenities include campgrounds, gyms, pools, hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, restaurant dining, bars, theaters, stadiums, museums, bowling alleys, large venues and casinos.
  • California  — Reversing. Amenities now closed include bars in some counties and gyms in some counties. Open amenities include manufacturing, warehouses, offices, movie, TV and music production, pet groomers, hair salons and barbershops in some counties, restaurant dining in some counties, bars in some counties, houses of worship, retail, casinos in some counties, museums in some counties, galleries, zoos, aquariums in some counties, bowling alleys, arcades, mini-golf, gyms in some counties — opening soon: nail salons, cosmetology services, tattoo parlors and piercing shops in some counties.
  • Colorado Reopening. Open amenities include salons and personal services, retail stores, offices, manufacturing, houses of worship, campgrounds, pools, playgrounds, gyms, restaurant dining, museums, indoor events, fairs, rodeos, concerts, outdoor events — opening soon: casinos.
  • Connecticut Reopening. Open amenities include restaurant dining, retail stores, malls, hair salons, nail salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, spas, museums, zoos, casinos, movie theaters, libraries, amusement parks, bowling alleys, offices, beaches and gyms — opening soon: bars.
  • Delaware Pausing. Open amenities include barbershops, hair salons, tanning salons, nail salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, farmers markets, retail stores, malls, beaches, pools, gyms, campgrounds, restaurants, bars, breweries, museums, libraries, galleries, live performances and casinos.
  • District of ColumbiaReopening. These amenities have reopened: retail shops for curbside pickup, restaurants are open for outdoor dining, libraries open to curbside pickup, dog parks, golf courses, tennis courts, parks, barbershops and hair salons — opening soon: nightclubs.
  • Florida Reversing. Amenities now closed include bars. Open amenities include restaurant dining, retail stores, beaches, trails, gyms, houses of worship and sporting venues without spectators, movie theaters, concert halls, bowling alleys in most counties, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, tanning salons and acupuncture in most counties.
  • Georgia Reopening. In spite of escalating case counts, Georgia is continuing down a path of economic reopening. Open amenities include gyms, bowling alleys, theaters, private social clubs, hair salons, barbershops, restaurant dining, large venues, bars and nightclubs.
  • Hawaii Reopening. Open amenities include beaches, piers, docks, etc., state parks, pools and waterparks in some areas, campgrounds in some areas, gyms, retail stores, pet groomers, salons and barbershops, nail salons in some areas and tattoo parlors in some areas, construction in some areas, offices in some areas, houses of worship and restaurant dining and bars.
  • Idaho Pausing. Open amenities include houses of worship, gyms, pools, waterparks, restaurant dining, bars, hair salons, movie theaters, nightclubs and large venues. Although Idaho was poised to move to stage 4 of reopening, they will pause in stage three for at least two weeks, into mid-July.
  •  Illinois Reopening. These amenities have reopened: state parks, limited fishing, boating, golf courses, gyms, retail stores, pet grooming, hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, spas, waxing centers, tattoo parlors, restaurant dining, manufacturing, offices, museums, theaters, and zoos.
  • Indiana Reopening. Amenities closed until further notice include conventions, fairs, parades and similar events. Open amenities include libraries, museums, zoos and aquariums, movie theaters, large venues, manufacturing, offices, houses of worship, restaurant dining, bars and nightclubs, spas, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, retail stores, gyms, pools, bowling alleys, tennis and basketball courts, campgrounds, amusement parks and water parks.
  • Iowa Reopened. Open amenities include houses of worship, libraries, movie theaters, museums, zoos, aquariums, casinos, outdoor venues, bowling alleys, amusement parks, indoor venues, campgrounds, gyms, pools, playgrounds, skating rinks, skate parks, medical spas, tanning salons, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc, restaurant dining, bars, retail stores and malls.
  • Kansas Reopened. Open amenities include restaurant dining, bars, retail stores, houses of worship, offices, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, gyms, community centers, sports facilities, pools, theaters, nightclubs, casinos, museums and bowling alleys.
  • Kentucky Reopening. Amenities closed until further notice include bars, venues and event spaces, and public pools. Gatherings are limited to a maximum of 50 people. Open amenities include houses of worship, manufacturing, construction, offices, pet grooming and boarding, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc., retail stores and restaurant dining, distilleries, movie theaters bowling alleys, aquatic centers, gyms, campgrounds, museums, aquariums, libraries and outdoor attractions.
  • Louisiana Pausing. Amenities closed until further notice include amusement parks, water parks and theme parks and concert and music halls. Open amenities include restaurant dining, bars, gyms, state parks, pools, malls, movie theaters, certain museums, zoos and aquariums, casinos, event centers, salons and barbershops, houses of worship, spas, tattoo parlors, pools, bowling alleys and skating rinks.
  • Maine Reopening. Amenities closed until further notice include spas, massage parlors, amusement parks, water parks, bowling alleys, arcades, movie theaters and performing arts venues. Open amenities include hair salons, barbershops, pet groomers, state parks, boating, golf courses, remote campgrounds, hunting and fishing, private campgrounds, RV parks, houses of worship, retail stores and restaurants, bars for outdoor service, gyms, nail salons and tattoo parlors.
  • Maryland Reopening. Amenities closed until further notice include bars and theaters. Open amenities include golf courses, outdoor shooting ranges, marinas, campgrounds, beaches, outdoor pools, day camps, gyms, retail stores, malls, manufacturing, construction, offices, hotels, lodging, houses of worship, hair salons and barbershops, massage parlors, tanning salons, tattoo parlors, restaurants open for outdoor dining, outdoor service at breweries, wineries, and distilleries — opening soon: casinos, and.
  • Massachusetts Reopening. Amenities closed until further notice include bars, movie theaters, museums, aquariums, amusement parks, water parks, theme parks, theaters, performance halls, ballrooms, stadiums, convention halls and gyms. Open amenities include golf courses, beaches, parks, fishing, hunting and boating, houses of worship, construction, manufacturing, offices, hotels, lodging, retail for curbside pickup, retail, hair salons, barbershops, pet grooming, nail salons, massage parlors, tanning salons and restaurants.
  • Michigan Pausing. Open amenities include golf courses, marinas, pools, gyms in some regions, construction, real estate, manufacturing, including auto companies, offices, retail, restaurants, bars, veterinary services, Pet groomers, hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, tattoo parlors, arcades, bowling alleys, theaters, night clubs and convention centers in some regions. The pause before progressing to stage 5 is expected to last until at least mid-July.
  • Minnesota Reopening. Open amenities include manufacturing, offices, retail stores and malls, houses of worship, restaurants and bars, salons and barbershops, tattoo parlors, campgrounds, gyms, theaters and concert halls, bowling alleys, arcades and museums.
  • Mississippi Reopened. Open amenities include retail stores, restaurant dining, bars, houses of worship, state parks, gyms, salons and barbershops, tattoo parlors, casinos, movie theaters, libraries and museums.
  • Missouri Reopened. Open amenities include retail stores, restaurant dining, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc., houses of worship, gyms, campgrounds, movie theaters, casinos and music venues.
  • Montana Reopening. Open amenities include houses of worship, retail stores, salons, barbershops, massage parlors, restaurant dining, bars, breweries and distilleries, gyms, museums and movie theaters, casinos, concert venues and bowling alleys.
  • Nebraska Reopening. (never issued a stay-at-home order, but closed businesses; regional reopenings) — Open amenities include houses of worship, retail, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, restaurant dining, bars, zoos, movie theaters, libraries, venues, pools and gyms.
  • Nevada Pausing. Open amenities include golf courses, pickleball, tennis courts, state parks, gyms, pools, waterparks, retail stores, malls, restaurants, bars, barbershops, hair salons and nail salons, cosmetology and skin services, massage therapy, tattoo and piercing shops, museums, art galleries, zoos and aquariums, movie theaters, bowling alleys, outdoor attractions, houses of worship and gaming.
  • New HampshireReopened. Amenities closed until further notice include movie theaters, amusement parks and live performances. Open amenities include retail stores, barbershops, hair salons, nail salons, tanning salons, tattoo shops, acupuncturists and massage therapists, golf courses, outdoor attractions beaches, personal and small group fitness training, gyms, pools, restaurants, houses of worship, libraries, museums, art galleries, bowling alleys and entertainment centers.
  • New JerseyReopening. Open amenities include golf courses, outdoor recreational businesses, beaches, campgrounds, pools, construction and retail stores, malls, outdoor dining at restaurants, houses of worship, libraries for curbside pickup, hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, tattoo parlors, spas, massage therapy and tanning salons — opening soon: breweries, wineries, distilleries, casinos, movie theaters, playgrounds, water parks, amusement parks and gyms.
  • New MexicoPausing. Phase 2 of New Mexico’s reopening is on indefinite hold as new cases of COVID-19 affect younger demographics. Amenities closed until further notice include bars, casinos, and theaters. Open amenities include state parks, golf courses, boating, gyms, pools, pet grooming and boarding, veterinary services, hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons, retail stores at 25% capacity, malls, restaurant dining, breweries, offices at 25% capacity, houses of worship.
  • New YorkReopening. Amenities closed until further notice include movie theaters, casinos, amusement parks, bowling alleys, and gyms. Open amenities include retail stores, houses of worship, beaches, fishing and hunting, public pools and playgrounds, outdoor zoos, botanical gardens, nature parks in some regions, offices, construction, manufacturing, agriculture, forestry, TV and film production in some regions, outdoor dining at restaurants in some regions, indoor dining in some regions, hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage parlors, nail salons in some regions, museums and aquariums in some regions.
  • North CarolinaPausing. Amenities closed until further notice include bars, movie theaters, bowling alleys, and gyms. Open amenities include retail stores, restaurant dining, houses of worship, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors and pools.
  • North Dakota (never issued a stay-at-home order, but closed businesses; allowed businesses to reopen May 1) — Reopening. Open amenities include retail, restaurant dining, bars, gyms, sports venues, salons, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc., houses of worship, movie theaters, music and entertainment venues.
  • Ohio Reopening. Open amenities include manufacturing, distribution, construction, offices, retail stores, salons, barbershops, etc., as well as dine-in restaurants and bars, campgrounds, gyms, pools, sports leagues, bowling alleys, miniature golf and batting cages, aquariums, zoos, skating rinks, playgrounds, country clubs, movie theaters, museums, art galleries, casinos, racinos, amusement parks and water parks.
  • Oklahoma Reopened. Open amenities include salons, barbershops, spas, pet groomers, etc., tattoo parlors, state parks, zoos, gyms, restaurant dining, bars, movie theaters, sports venues, museums, nightclubs, houses of worship and offices.
  • Oregon Pausing. Oregon has paused in Phase 2 of reopening until at least September. Open amenities include some state parks, outdoor recreation facilities, gyms in some counties, pools in most counties, restaurants, retail stores, salons and barbershops, movie theaters, bowling alleys in most counties and offices in most counties.
  • Pennsylvania Reopening. Open amenities include golf courses, marinas, guided fishing trips, privately-owned campgrounds, gyms in most counties, beaches, outdoor sports, state parks, public pools, retail stores, restaurants and bars in most counties, hair salons, barbershops, spas in most counties and casinos, theaters and shopping malls in most counties.
  • Puerto RicoReopening. Open amenities include restaurants, salons, barbershops, pet grooming, spas. retail stores, malls, outdoor malls and beaches, gyms, museums, cinemas, auto-cinemas, outdoor concerts and other open venues, and houses of worship.
  • Rhode IslandReopening. Indoor social gatherings are limited to 25 people until further notice. Open amenities include state parks, beaches, gyms, casinos, campgrounds, retail stores, malls, offices, hair salons, barbershops, nail salons, massage parlors, tattoo shops, restaurant dining and houses of worship.
  • South CarolinaReopening. Open amenities include retail stores, beaches, piers, docks, etc., gyms, pools, restaurant dining, salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors etc., museums, zoos, aquariums and houses of worship.
  • South Dakota (Did not have a statewide stay-at-home order). Remained Open. Businesses did not close down. All businesses and amenities are open. The government of South Dakota requests that residents and visitors alike follow CDC recommendations and follow appropriate social distancing guidelines.
  • TennesseeReopening. Open amenities include state parks, gyms in most counties, theaters, museums, amusement parks, restaurant dining in most counties, retail stores in most counties, salons and barbershops, etc. in most counties.
  • Texas Reversing. Amenities closed until further notice include bars and reduced capacity in restaurants. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 100 people. Elective surgeries are prohibited in Harris, Dallas, Travis, and Bexar counties (containing the four largest cities and the largest concentrations of infections). Open amenities include state parks, pools, gyms, natural caverns, waterparks, amusement parks, carnivals, zoos, retail stores, malls, restaurant dining, movie theaters, museums, libraries, bowling alleys, bingo halls, skating rinks, rodeos, aquariums, salons, barbershops, etc., massage and personal care, offices and manufacturing.
  • Utah Reopening. Open amenities include restaurant dining, houses of worship, salons, personal care businesses, gyms and pools.
  • Vermont Reopening. Open amenities include manufacturing, construction, distribution, state parks, golf courses, trails etc., campgrounds, gyms, fitness centers, retail stores, houses of worship, hair salons and barbershops, nail salons, spas, tattoo parlors, museums, theaters, libraries and restaurant dining.
  • Virginia Reopening. Moving to Phase 3 as of July 1. Removing capacity limits in retail stores and restaurants. Open amenities include restaurants and bars, retail stores, salons, barbershops, etc., beaches, campgrounds, gyms, pools and houses of worship, gyms, pools, museums, zoos, aquariums and outdoor concerts.
  • Washington Pausing. The state is pausing indefinitely in Stage 3 before moving into Stage 4. Open amenities include state parks, fishing, hunting, golf courses, gyms in most counties, retail stores in most counties, restaurant dining in most counties, construction, hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, etc.in most counties, pet grooming, religious services in most counties and casinos.
  • West VirginiaReopening. Open amenities include salons, barbershops, pet groomers, tanning salons, spas, massage parlors, gyms, recreation centers, state parks, campgrounds, museums, zoos, pools, casinos, restaurant dining, bars, retail stores and malls, bowling alleys, pool halls, movie theaters and roller rinks.
  • Wisconsin Reopened. Open amenities include golf courses, state parks, gyms, houses of worship, pet groomers for curbside dropoff, salons, barbershops, spas, retail stores, restaurants and bars.
  • Wyoming (Never issued a stay-at-home order, but closed businesses; allowed businesses to reopen May 1) — Pausing. Amenities closed until July 15 include retail stores. Capacity restrictions on restaurants, bars, and gyms until July 15. Open amenities include gyms, state parks, hair salons, barbershops, tattoo parlors, massage therapy, etc., restaurant dining, movie theaters and entertainment venues.

All states except Montana and Wyoming had closed schools for extended periods of time before the summer break, with many shut down until the end of the academic school year or until further notice. Most schools and colleges conducted online learning. Commencements have been delayed or postponed for most high schools, colleges and universities. Many institutions are making arrangements for graduates to walk with future graduating classes. Decisions about fall classes will be made at a later time as more information becomes available.

A total of 12 states still have self-quarantines upon individuals entering from specific “hot” infection zones in an attempt to keep citizens of their states safer. States enforcing quarantines include Alaska, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Rhode Island, Utah and Vermont. Most of those states are requiring entrants to undergo a 14-day self-quarantine, although Utah is requesting entrants to fill out and file forms with the health department.

CDC Guideline Updates

No significant new public guidance was issued this last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). States are continuing to follow the comprehensive guidance issued for reopening and for contact tracing. Although guidelines on social distancing are no longer being maintained by the CDC, many states are continuing to follow past guidance. Other guidelines are in effect, including the hand hygiene guidelines. It is still advisable to:

  • Stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) away from other people.
  • Avoid groups and mass gatherings, as well as crowded spaces.
  • Use a cloth face covering to cover your mouth and nose when you’re in public places, such as the grocery store.
  • Work from home, if you’re able.
  • Avoid using any kind of public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis, if possible. If you must use these modes of transport, be sure to wear a cloth face cover.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. When hand-washing isn’t an option, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol (but the higher the percent, the better).
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces using an EPA-registered household disinfectant. Spots to watch out for include doorknobs, light switches, toilets and other objects in shared spaces.

On June 25, the CDC updated and expanded the list of people who are at risk of severe COVID-19 illness. Older adults and people with underlying medical conditions remain at increased risk for severe illness, but now the CDC has further defined age- and condition-related risks. For instance, they removed the age-specific threshold of 65 years old and instead state that risk increases steadily as we age.

The list of underlying medical conditions which increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness was expanded to include:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Obesity (BMI of 30 or higher)
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
  • Serious heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • High blood pressure
  • Neurologic conditions such as dementia
  • Cerebrovascular disease such as stroke
  • Pregnancy

About 40% of the US population is obese. Up to 60% of the population could be subject to one or more of these conditions.

Financial Updates

Another 1.43 million people filed for unemployment claims last week, joining the more than 47 million already unemployed in the US — suggesting a current unemployment rate of over 24.0% and an estimated total of over 48.5 million job losses. The 1.43 million is higher than the estimates proffered by Wall Street of 1.38 million and marks the 15th consecutive week that claim numbers have exceeded 1 million. Additional claims are likely to continue to be filed. Continuing claims remained relatively steady at 19.29 million.

In a separate report issued this week, the Labor Department claimed that 4.8 million jobs were added back to the economy in June. The numbers were based on a survey submitted mid-month in June, and do not reflect reversals and pauses in the economies of several states that have experienced surges in infection rates after Memorial Day weekend and protests that took place through mid-June.

Testing Capacity

As of July 1 at 1 pm Eastern time (1700 GMT), the US has officially run more than 34,420,137 tests for COVID-19. It has run approximately 4.70 million of those tests since last week (June 24). Some leading researchers have estimated that a capacity of 3-4 million tests per week is needed for the economy to fully reopen safely. Admiral Brett Giroir, the Health and Human Services (HHS) Testing Czar said that they were working to provide the ability to test up to 50 million people per month by September. That number may still be a bit low based on recommendations by the Rockefeller Foundation, which calls for testing capability to be ramped to 30 million tests per week by October.

Is This The Second Wave?

Infections increased in 44 states last week. Among the hardest hit were California, Texas, Florida, Georgia and Arizona. Florida posted a high of 10,109 cases on Thursday, coming uncomfortably close to the highest daily totals seen in New York during the peak of the crisis in that state. Texas and California posted daily cases over 8,000 and 9,000, respectively this week. In total, the average daily case count for the US over the last 8 days has been 46,367 cases per day.

In the last week, The US has outpaced the cases seen in April of this year. Some experts have characterized this as a continuation of the first wave while others argue it dwarfs the first wave in magnitude already.

CDC Argues Contact Tracing Cannot Work at This Point

Because of the widespread, multi-pointed outbreak, CDC representative Dr. Anne Schuchat argued the current futility of contact tracing, isolation, and containment of infection vectors (those individuals who are carrying viral loads in society asymptomatically, pre-symptomatically, or ill). Part of her point was that there were simply too many points of infection to reasonably trace.

Speaking on Monday, June 29, Dr. Schuchat suggested that this week’s surge is just the beginning of our fight against the coronavirus, not the end by any means. The complexity of the number of places where infections are surging and the speed at which infections are traveling and taking place also makes fighting the virus a challenge.

She suggested the best ways to fight the virus, on a personal basis, were still to use good hand hygiene, to wear masks, and distance from others (at home, when possible).

What to Do if You Get Sick

Call your healthcare provider or reach out to a telehealth provider if you believe you have COVID-19. Do not go to a medical facility without calling ahead. It may be possible to treat symptoms of the virus at home with over-the-counter medications. When you speak to your doctor or telehealth provider, they will be able to evaluate your symptoms and their severity and will direct you to go to a testing center or hospital, if necessary.

If you have a medical emergency, call 911; tell them if you or anyone else in the home might have COVID-19. If you have questions or aren’t sure what to do, call your local health department. Many states have hotlines set up for this purpose. Some states have 211 service lines that you can call for help and resources.

It might be a second wave or it might be a resurgence of the first. Either way, it’s imperative to be vigilant and to apply basic principles. Keep your hands clean by washing with soap and water or, if those items aren’t available, by using hand sanitizer containing 60+% alcohol; use face coverings when in public places, especially in crowds or in enclosed spaces; minimize contact with those outside your immediate family when possible; and social distance when in the presence of others outside your family unit. As you seek fun and solace in the warm summer sun, be careful and be safe.

~Here’s to Your Healthy Pursuits!

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